Tutkimusta migreenin hoidosta akupunktiolla

Akupunktiota on tutkittu paljon migreeninhoidossa. Nykyisen tietämyksen mukaan akupunktio saattaa olla jopa tehokkaampaa kuin estolääkitys. Sillä on tutkimuksien mukaan havaittu vähemmän sivuvaikutuksia kuin lääkkeillä ja se on osassa tutkimuksia parantanut lääkitystä enemmän myös migreenipotilaiden elämänlaatua.

Osassa tutkimuksia parhaat tulokset on saatu lääkityksen ja akupunktion yhdistelmällä. Mikäli migreenilääkitys ei sovi tai lääkityksen teho ei ole riittävää, akupunktion kokeilu voi olla tutkimusten mukaan hyödyllistä. Joidenkin alla olevien tutkimusten mukaan akupunktiohoitosarjan vaikutus voi kestää 6-12kk hoitosarjan jälkeenkin, mutta pidempiä seurantatutkimuksia ei ole vielä saatavilla.

Migreenitutkimuksissa on pyritty selvittämään migreeniin vaikuttavia tekijöitä sekä sitä, miksi ja miten akupunktio auttaa. Joitakin mahdollisia vaikutusmekanismeja on selvinnyt, mutta paljon on vielä kysymyksiä. Vaikutusmekanismien lisäksi akupunktion käytöstä migreenin hoidossa löytyy myös joitakin tutkimuksia, joissa on pyritty selvittämään akupunktion mahdollista kustannustehokkuutta terveydenhuollossa.

 
 

Selaa tutkimuksia tai valitse aiheaulue




 
 

Evidence of Potential Mechanisms of Acupuncture from Functional MRI Data for Migraine Prophylaxis.

"PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the clinical neuroimaging evidence pertaining to the potential mechanisms of acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis. RECENT FINDINGS: From a descriptive perspective, converging evidence from recent neuroimaging studies, mainly from functional MRI (fMRI) studies, has demonstrated that when compared with sham acupuncture, verum acupuncture could normalize the decrease of the functional ..."
Chang C., Yang C. et al. (2021) Evidence of Potential Mechanisms of Acupuncture from Functional MRI Data for Migraine Prophylaxis. Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2021;25(7):49.   🔗

A Narrative Review of Neuroimaging Studies in Acupuncture for Migraine.

"Acupuncture has been widely used as an alternative and complementary therapy for migraine. With the development of neuroimaging techniques, the central mechanism of acupuncture for migraine has gained increasing attention. This review aimed to analyze the study design and main findings of neuroimaging studies of acupuncture for migraine to provide the reference for future ..."
Ma P., Dong X. et al. (2021) A Narrative Review of Neuroimaging Studies in Acupuncture for Migraine. Pain Res Manag. 2021:9460695.  🔗

Cupping Therapy for Migraine: A PRISMA-Compliant Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

"...Results: 218 studies were identified, and 6 RCTs were enrolled in this review. In comparison to drugs, wet cupping showed a higher total effective rate (TER). In the dry cupping plus acupuncture, the result of TER showed more effectiveness (RR 1.05, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.12, =0.13) compared with acupuncture alone, but there was no statistically significant difference. In qualitative analysis, the results showed wet cupping plus drugs treatment could quickly relieve pain and significantly improve patients' quality of life and wet cupping could reduce headache pain. ..."
Seo J., Chu H. et al. (2021) Cupping Therapy for Migraine: A PRISMA-Compliant Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2021:7582581.  🔗

A Bibliometric Analysis of Research Trends of Acupuncture Therapy in the Treatment of Migraine from 2000 to 2020.

"...Results: A total of 572 publications were included in the final analysis. The total number of publications has continued to increase with some fluctuations over the past 20 years. The most productive country and institution in this field were the USA, and Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, respectively. The most active and cited authors were Liang FR and Linde K, respectively. was the most productive, cited, and co-cited journal. The Linde K (2005) had the highest co-citation, citation number and centrality. The keywords "migraine" ranked first in frequency. The common type of migraine (tension-type headache), research method (randomized controlled trial, multicenter, double-blind), acupuncture's role (prophylactic, quality of life, pain), and evaluation (meta-analysis, systematic review) were the hotspots and frontier trends of acupuncture therapy on migraine between 2000 and 2020. ..."
Zhao T., Guo J. et al. (2021) A Bibliometric Analysis of Research Trends of Acupuncture Therapy in the Treatment of Migraine from 2000 to 2020. J Pain Res. 2021;14:1399-1414.  🔗

Problems of scientific methodology related to placebo control in Qigong studies: A systematic review.

"...RESULTS: 110 articles were found, 78 of which were excluded after examining the title and abstract, and 16 because they were duplicates. Four more articles were found by searching in the bibliographies of published papers. A total of 20 studies were included in this systematic review. We found that, to the best of our knowledge, no criteria for placebo controls have been published in peer-reviewed journals so far. ..."
Gonçalves M., Matos L. et al. (2020) Problems of scientific methodology related to placebo control in Qigong studies: A systematic review. J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2020;24(4):261-270.   🔗

Acupuncture for menstrual migraine: a systematic review.

"...RESULTS: Thirteen studies with 826 subjects were included, 9 of which had data suitable for meta-analyses. Current evidence showed that acupuncture was not superior to sham acupuncture in reducing monthly migraine frequency and duration, average headache intensity, and analgesic use at completion of treatment or follow-up. Pooled data demonstrated a significant improvement in mean headache intensity in the acupuncture group compared with drugs. However, all studies were underpowered and associated with moderate to high risk of bias. No serious adverse event was related to acupuncture treatment. ..."
Yang M., Du T. et al. (2020) Acupuncture for menstrual migraine: a systematic review. BMJ Support Palliat Care. 2020.  🔗

Systematic Review: Acupuncture vs Standard Pharmacological Therapy for Migraine Prevention.

"...RESULTS: Out of the 706 search results, 7 clinical trials, with a total of 1430 participants, met inclusion criteria for trials comparing the effectiveness of acupuncture to standard pharmacologic treatment. Several of the studies showed acupuncture to be more effective than standard pharmacological treatments for migraine prevention; however, methodological heterogeneity precluded aggregation of these data. ..."
Zhang N., Houle T. et al. (2020) Systematic Review: Acupuncture vs Standard Pharmacological Therapy for Migraine Prevention. Headache. 2020;60(2):309-317.   🔗

Acupuncture vs. Pharmacological Prophylaxis of Migraine: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

"Migraine is a chronic paroxymal neurological disorder characterized by attacks of moderate to severe headache and reversible neurological and systemic symptoms. Treatment of migraine includes acute therapies, that aim to reduce the intensity of pain of each attack, and preventive therapies that should decrease the frequency of headache recurrence. The objective of this systematic ..."
Giovanardi C., Cinquini M. et al. (2020) Acupuncture vs. Pharmacological Prophylaxis of Migraine: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials. Front Neurol. 2020;11:576272.  🔗

Effectiveness and Safety of Acupuncture for Migraine: An Overview of Systematic Reviews.

"...Results: A total of 15 SRs were included. All the SRs were published between 2011-2019. Based on AMSTAR 2, 14 out of 15 SRs were rated critically low quality and 1 was rated low quality. According to ROBIS tool, 9 SRs (60%) were low risk of bias. With the PRISMA-A checklist, we found 11 out of 15 SRs were found adequately reported over 70%. With the GRADE tool, we found high quality of evidence indicated that the effective rate of acupuncture was superior to western medicine in treatment of migraine. Besides, acupuncture reduced more headache days and the times of using painkiller and was more effective in reducing the frequency and degree of headache than western medicine and sham acupuncture. . There might be some missing information. The accuracy of the conclusions may be decreased reduced since we were unable to synthesis all the evidence. ..."
Li Y., Xiao X. et al. (2020) Effectiveness and Safety of Acupuncture for Migraine: An Overview of Systematic Reviews. Pain Res Manag. 2020:3825617.  🔗

Acupuncture versus Various Control Treatments in the Treatment of Migraine: A Review of Randomized Controlled Trials from the Past 10 Years.

"...Results: Forty-nine studies were analyzed and ranked based on the latest STRICTA and Cochrane Collaboration risk-of-bias assessment standards. The analysis revealed that acupuncture reduced headache frequency compared with no treatment (mean difference [MD] = -1.80, P < 0.00001, 95% confidence interval [CI] -2.34 to -1.26) and western medicine (MD = -1.75, P = 0.003, 95% CI -2.91 to -0.58). Headache frequency did not significantly differ between patients who received real acupuncture versus those who received sham acupuncture (MD = -0.64, P = 0.24, 95% CI -1.70 to 0.42). ..."
Ni X., Dong L. et al. (2020) Acupuncture versus Various Control Treatments in the Treatment of Migraine: A Review of Randomized Controlled Trials from the Past 10 Years. J Pain Res. 2020;13:2033-2064.  🔗

Systematic Review of Episodic Migraine Prophylaxis: Efficacy of Conventional Treatments Used in Comparisons with Acupuncture.

"A Cochrane Systematic Review published by Linde et al. in 2016 found moderate evidence suggesting that acupuncture is "at least non-inferior" to conventional prophylactic drug treatments (flunarizine, metoprolol, and valproic acid) for episodic migraine prophylaxis. The evidence for the efficacy of these conventional treatments must be verified to strengthen and validate the original comparison made ..."
Trinh K., Diep D. et al. (2019) Systematic Review of Episodic Migraine Prophylaxis: Efficacy of Conventional Treatments Used in Comparisons with Acupuncture. Med Acupunct. 2019;31(2):85-97.   🔗

Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Electroacupuncture in Migraine Treatment: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis.

"Considering the heavy burden of migraine, it is essential to update insufficient and/or outdated clinical evidence supporting electroacupuncture (EA) in migraine therapy. In this study, a literature search of seven medical databases was performed. After data extraction and quality evaluation, 13 randomized controlled trials, including 1559 patients, were assessed in this analysis. Results demonstrated that ..."
Li X., Dai Q. et al. (2019) Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Electroacupuncture in Migraine Treatment: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis. Am J Chin Med. 2019;47(8):1755-1780.   🔗

Acupuncture for the prevention of episodic migraine.

"...RESULTS: Twenty-two trials including 4985 participants in total (median 71, range 30 to 1715) met our updated selection criteria. We excluded five previously included trials from this update because they included people who had had migraine for less than 12 months, and included five new trials. Five trials had a no-acupuncture control group (either treatment of attacks only or non-regulated routine care), 15 a sham-acupuncture control group, and five a comparator group receiving prophylactic drug treatment. In comparisons with no-acupuncture control groups and groups receiving prophylactic drug treatment, there was risk of performance and detection bias as blinding was not possible. Overall the quality of the evidence was moderate. Comparison with no acupunctureAcupuncture was associated with a moderate reduction of headache frequency over no acupuncture after treatment (four trials, 2199 participants; standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.56; 95% CI -0.65 to -0.48); findings were statistically heterogeneous (I² = 57%; moderate quality evidence). After treatment headache frequency at least halved in 41% of participants receiving acupuncture and 17% receiving no acupuncture (pooled risk ratio (RR) 2.40; 95% CI 2.08 to 2.76; 4 studies, 2519 participants) with a corresponding number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) of 4 (95% CI 3 to 6); there was no indication of statistical heterogeneity (I² = 7%; moderate quality evidence). The only trial with post-treatment follow-up found a small but significant benefit 12 months after randomisation (RR 2.16; 95% CI 1.35 to 3.45; NNT 7; 95% 4 to 25; 377 participants, low quality evidence). Comparison with sham acupunctureBoth after treatment (12 trials, 1646 participants) and at follow-up (10 trials, 1534 participants), acupuncture was associated with a small but statistically significant frequency reduction over sham (moderate quality evidence). The SMD was -0.18 (95% CI -0.28 to -0.08; I² = 47%) after treatment and -0.19 (95% CI -0.30 to -0.09; I² = 59%) at follow-up. After treatment headache frequency at least halved in 50% of participants receiving true acupuncture and 41% receiving sham acupuncture (pooled RR 1.23, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.36; I² = 48%; 14 trials, 1825 participants) and at follow-up in 53% and 42%, respectively (pooled RR 1.25, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.39; I² = 61%; 11 trials, 1683 participants; moderate quality evidence). The corresponding NNTBs are 11 (95% CI 7.00 to 20.00) and 10 (95% CI 6.00 to 18.00), respectively. The number of participants dropping out due to adverse effects (odds ratio (OR) 2.84; 95% CI 0.43 to 18.71; 7 trials, 931 participants; low quality evidence) and the number of participants reporting adverse effects (OR 1.15; 95% CI 0.85 to 1.56; 4 trials, 1414 participants; moderate quality evidence) did not differ significantly between acupuncture and sham groups. Comparison with prophylactic drug treatmentAcupuncture reduced migraine frequency significantly more than drug prophylaxis after treatment ( SMD -0.25; 95% CI -0.39 to -0.10; 3 trials, 739 participants), but the significance was not maintained at follow-up (SMD -0.13; 95% CI -0.28 to 0.01; 3 trials, 744 participants; moderate quality evidence). After three months headache frequency at least halved in 57% of participants receiving acupuncture and 46% receiving prophylactic drugs (pooled RR 1.24; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.44) and after six months in 59% and 54%, respectively (pooled RR 1.11; 95% CI 0.97 to 1.26; moderate quality evidence). Findings were consistent among trials with I² being 0% in all analyses. Trial participants receiving acupuncture were less likely to drop out due to adverse effects (OR 0.27; 95% CI 0.08 to 0.86; 4 trials, 451 participants) and to report adverse effects (OR 0.25; 95% CI 0.10 to 0.62; 5 trials 931 participants) than participants receiving prophylactic drugs (moderate quality evidence). AUTHORS' ..."
Linde K., Allais G. et al. (2016) Acupuncture for the prevention of episodic migraine. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016(6):CD001218.  🔗

Cerebral hemodynamic responses to acupuncture in migraine patients: a systematic review.

"We review the literature conjoining acupuncture, migraine, and cerebral hemodynamics. To do so, we searched PubMed in March 2013 for studies investigating cerebral hemodynamics with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound, and other tools in migraineurs, acupuncture recipients, and migraineurs receiving acupuncture. Our search identified 1321 distinct articles - acupuncture (..."
Lo M., Lin J. et al. (2013) Cerebral hemodynamic responses to acupuncture in migraine patients: a systematic review. J Tradit Complement Med. 2013;3(4):213-20.   🔗